Independent Student Newspaper for the University of Texas at San Antonio

The Paisano

Independent Student Newspaper for the University of Texas at San Antonio

The Paisano

Independent Student Newspaper for the University of Texas at San Antonio

The Paisano

Sugar Daddy? Yes, please

Sugar+Daddy%3F+Yes%2C+please
Elizabeth Hope

Money, green little sheets of paper that few have in abundance and most have in scarcity. While having money is not everything, not having it is. The amount someone has in their bank account, their assets and their debt, can all be passed on from generation to generation and it can make or break someone. Those without money are often desperate for an opportunity to acquire more.

One of those opportunities presents itself in sugar dating. Best described as a relationship where an older, wealthier individual provides a young, broke “sugar baby” financial support. The sugar mommy or daddy can cover their baby’s living expenses or provide them with luxurious gifts in exchange for an intimate or platonic companionship. 

There are more than three million college students in the U.S. who are considered “sugar babies” as they have succumbed to the broke college student archetype. These relationships are heavily stigmatized and often perceived as greedy gold diggers exploiting the woeful wealthy, or yet another instance of the rich taking advantage of the vulnerable lower class. With that being said, can they be considered ethical? 

These relationships are never a sure thing due to the fleeting nature of money and the circumstances of the individuals involved. Oftentimes sugar parents are married and keep their sugar baby a secret from their partner, and it is common for sugar babies to sacrifice their dignity and self-respect to please their sugar parents and make enough money to get by. At any time, something could go wrong, such as a partner finding out or someone getting scammed or taken advantage of. 

Despite most creating and agreeing to boundaries for the relationship, it is not unheard of for some to feel displeased with the established boundaries. Sugar parents may feel entitled to more intimacy from their sugar baby as their relationship continues. Additionally, how is a set list of requirements for companionship ever going to have the “right” price? Sugar babies can charge anywhere from $1,000 per month to $10,000 a month for their companionship, but it all depends on what the financially challenged sugar baby feels is suitable compensation for their services. 

Sugar relationships may seem like the key to resolving one’s financial troubles, but the pressures of satisfying a demanding sugar mommy or daddy and the need to make ends meet fade the thought of these relationships as being ethical.

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About the Contributor
Elizabeth Hope, Staff Writer
Elizabeth Hope (she/her) is a senior and a communication major at UTSA. She is originally from Montana and moved to Austin when she was 11. In 2022 she earned her associates degree in journalism from Austin Community College. After graduation she hopes to pursue a career in journalism or policy and advocacy for environmental issues. Outside of work and school she enjoys playing piano, reading and making jewelry.

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